English: King David Handing the Letter to Uria...
English: King David Handing the Letter to Uriah (1611) by Pieter Lastman, oil on panel, 51.1 x 61.3 cm, Detroit Institute of Arts (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

My friend Kathy Patrick of Beauty and the Book and the Pulpwood Queens wrote to me a couple weeks ago, letting me know that her pastor, Allison Byerly, used The Care and Handling of Roses with Thorns in her Sunday sermon in Jefferson, Texas.

How cool is that?

She cited page 251, where Dara talks to Gal about their relationship, and relates it to the story of <a href="http://www.gci.org/bible/hist/samuel5“>David and Uriah. King David made a series of bad decisions that culminating in having a soldier named Uriah killed, so David could be with his wife.

How does that relate to my women’s fiction story?

In the book, Gal had isolated herself and was not always making the best decisions, or being the nicest friend.

I think the message here is we need other people to slap us out of our narrow-view world. Be the friend that isn’t a yes man, that says, “Hey, that’s not right. Cut it out.” Even if it’s a risk.

Too often, people keep their mouths shut because they don’t want to lose the friendship, or they want to be seen as non-judgmental and supportive. But sometimes people need a nudge and another perspective.